top of page

Group

Public·51 members

Phoenix Beta 1.5 Beta (UPDATED LINK) - YouTube



Phoenix 1.5 beta 8: What's New and How to Install It




Phoenix is a popular web framework for building scalable and interactive web applications with Elixir, a functional programming language that runs on the Erlang virtual machine. Phoenix is known for its high performance, productivity, and reliability, as well as its support for real-time features such as websockets and server-sent events.




Phoenix 1.5 beta 8



In this article, we will explore what's new in Phoenix 1.5 beta 8, the latest pre-release version of the framework that introduces some exciting changes and improvements. We will also show you how to install Phoenix 1.5 beta 8 and create a new project with it.


Features of Phoenix 1.5 beta 8




Phoenix 1.5 beta 8 comes with several new features and enhancements that make it easier and more enjoyable to develop web applications with Phoenix. Here are some of the highlights:


LiveDashboard




LiveDashboard is a new feature that allows you to monitor and debug your Phoenix applications in real-time using a web interface. LiveDashboard provides various metrics and information about your application, such as request logs, process statistics, memory usage, database queries, etc. You can also use LiveDashboard to inspect and interact with your processes, ETS tables, and sockets.


LiveDashboard is built with LiveView, another feature of Phoenix that we will discuss next.


LiveView




LiveView is a feature that enables you to build rich and interactive web applications without writing any JavaScript code. LiveView uses websockets to communicate between the server and the client, and updates the DOM dynamically based on the server-side state changes.


LiveView allows you to write your UI logic in Elixir, and leverage the power and expressiveness of the language to create complex and reactive user interfaces. LiveView also handles latency, concurrency, and authentication issues for you, making your development process simpler and faster.


PubSub 2.0




PubSub is a feature that allows you to broadcast messages to multiple subscribers across different nodes in a distributed system. PubSub is used by Phoenix to implement its real-time features such as channels and presence.


PubSub 2.0 is a major rewrite of the PubSub system that improves its performance, scalability, and reliability. PubSub 2.0 uses a new fast global registry called Registry (yes, that's the name) that replaces the previous PG2-based implementation. Registry is based on ETS tables and uses a consistent hashing algorithm to distribute the load evenly across the nodes.


Ecto 3.4




Ecto is a database abstraction layer and query builder for Elixir that works well with Phoenix. Ecto allows you to define schemas, validations, associations, and queries for your data models, as well as perform migrations, transactions, and other database operations.


Ecto 3.4 is the latest version of Ecto that introduces some new features and improvements, such as:



  • A new :on_replace option for associations that allows you to specify what happens when a parent record is replaced or deleted.



  • A new :prefix option for queries that allows you to specify a schema prefix for your tables.



  • A new :structs option for Ecto.Repo.insert_all/3 and Ecto.Repo.update_all/3 that allows you to insert or update multiple records at once using structs instead of maps.



  • A new Ecto.Enum module that allows you to define custom types for enums in your schemas.



  • A new Ecto.Query.group_by/3 macro that allows you to group by expressions instead of fields.



  • A new Ecto.Query.having/2 macro that allows you to filter by aggregate functions in your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.limit/2 macro that allows you to limit the number of records returned by your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.offset/2 macro that allows you to skip a number of records in your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.order_by/3 macro that allows you to order by expressions instead of fields.



  • A new Ecto.Query.select/3 macro that allows you to select expressions instead of fields in your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.where/3 macro that allows you to filter by expressions instead of fields in your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.window/2 macro that allows you to define window functions in your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.with_cte/3 macro that allows you to define common table expressions (CTEs) in your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.with_fragment/2 macro that allows you to inject raw SQL fragments into your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Query.with_lock/2 macro that allows you to lock rows in your queries using different strategies.



  • A new Ecto.Query.with_recursive/4 macro that allows you to define recursive CTEs in your queries.



  • A new Ecto.Queryable.to_query/1 protocol function that allows you to convert any data structure into an Ecto query.



  • A new Ecto.Repo.aggregate/4 function that allows you to perform aggregate functions on your data models.



  • A new Ecto.Repo.delete_all/2 function that allows you to delete multiple records at once using a query or a changeset.



  • A new Ecto.Repo.insert_all/3 function that allows you to insert multiple records at once using maps or structs.



  • A new Ecto.Repo.update_all/3 function that allows you to update multiple records at once using a query or a changeset.



  • A new Ecto.Repo.stream/2 function that allows you to stream records from the database using a query or a changeset.



  • A new Ecto.Schema.has_one/3 macro that allows you to define one-to-one associations in your schemas.



  • A new Ecto.Schema.timestamps/1 macro that allows you to add timestamps fields (:inserted_at, :updated_at) to your schemas with custom options.



A new <


  • ... Some possible continuations are: ... - li>An improved integration with Telemetry that allows you to track various events and metrics related to Ecto operations.



- li>An improved support for PostgreSQL features such as arrays, ranges, JSONB operators, etc.


- li>An improved support for MySQL features such as JSON operators, full-text search, etc.


- li>An improved support for SQLite features such as recursive CTEs, window functions, etc.


- li>An improved support for MSSQL features such as CTEs, window functions, etc.


- li>An improved error handling and reporting for various database errors and exceptions.


- li>An improved ... Installation of Phoenix 1.5 beta 8




If you are interested in trying out Phoenix 1.5 beta 8, you will need to install it on your machine. Here are the steps to do so:


Prerequisites




Before you can install Phoenix 1.5 beta 8, you will need to have the following software installed on your machine:



  • Elixir 1.9 or later: Elixir is the programming language that Phoenix is built with. You can download and install Elixir from here.



  • Node.js 10.16 or later: Node.js is a JavaScript runtime that Phoenix uses to compile and run its assets. You can download and install Node.js from here.



  • PostgreSQL 9.6 or later: PostgreSQL is a relational database that Phoenix uses to store its data. You can download and install PostgreSQL from here.



You can check if you have these software installed by running the following commands in your terminal:


elixir --version node --version psql --version


You should see something like this:


Erlang/OTP 23 [erts-11.1.8] [source] [64-bit] [smp:4:4] [ds:4:4:10] [async-threads:1] [hipe] Elixir 1.11.4 (compiled with Erlang/OTP 23) v14.17.6 psql (PostgreSQL) 13.4


Downloading Phoenix 1.5 beta 8




Once you have the prerequisites installed, you can download Phoenix 1.5 beta 8 from its GitHub repository using the following command:


git clone https://github.com/phoenixframework/phoenix.git


This will create a directory called phoenix in your current working directory, where you will find the source code of Phoenix 1.5 beta 8.


Creating a new project with Phoenix 1.5 beta 8




To create a new project with Phoenix 1.5 beta 8, you will need to use the phx.new mix task that comes with Phoenix. However, since we are using a pre-release version of Phoenix, we will need to specify the path to the Phoenix source code directory that we cloned earlier.


For example, if you want to create a new project called my_app, you can run the following command:


mix phx.new my_app --path phoenix/installer


This will generate a new directory called my_app in your current working directory, where you will find the files and folders of your new Phoenix project.


Running the project with Phoenix 1.5 beta 8




To run your new project with Phoenix 1.5 beta 8, you will need to do the following steps:



  • Navigate to your project directory: cd my_app



  • Install the dependencies: mix deps.get



  • Create and migrate the database: mix ecto.setup



  • Install the Node.js dependencies: npm install --prefix assets



  • Start the server: mix phx.server



You should see something like this:


[info] Running MyAppWeb.Endpoint with cowboy 2.9.0 at :::4000 (http) [info] Access MyAppWeb.Endpoint at http://localhost:4000 [info] Running MyAppWeb.Endpoint with cowboy 2.9.0 at :::4000 (http) [info] Access MyAppWeb.Endpoint at http://localhost:4000 [info] GET / [debug] Processing with MyAppWeb.PageController.index/2 Parameters: % Pipelines: [:browser] [info] Sent 200 in 7ms [info] GET /css/app.css [debug] Processing with Phoenix.StaticPlug.call/2 Parameters: % Pipelines: [:browser] [info] Sent 200 in 6ms [info] GET /js/app.js [debug] Processing with Phoenix.StaticPlug.call/2 Parameters: % Pipelines: [:browser] [info] Sent 200 in 7ms [info] CONNECTED TO MyAppWeb.UserSocket in 7µs Transport: :websocket Serializer: Phoenix.Socket.V2.JSONSerializer Parameters: %"_csrf_token" => "FQYlJgQwJwYyJgQwJwYyJgQwJwYyJgQwJwYyJgQwJwYyJgQwJwYyJgQwJwYyJgQw", "vsn" => "2.0.0"


You can now visit http://localhost:4000 in your browser and see your new Phoenix project running.


Conclusion




In this article, we have learned what's new in Phoenix 1.5 beta 8, the latest pre-release version of the web framework for Elixir. We have also learned how to install Phoenix 1.5 beta 8 and create a new project with it.


We hope you enjoyed this article and found it useful and informative. If you want to learn more about Phoenix and Elixir, you can check out their official websites and documentation:



  • Phoenix website



  • Phoenix documentation



  • Elixir website



  • Elixir documentation



You can also follow their GitHub repositories and Twitter accounts for updates and news:



  • Phoenix GitHub repository



  • @phoenixframework on Twitter



  • Elixir GitHub repository



  • @elixirlang on Twitter



Thank you for reading and happy coding!


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)





  • What is the difference between Phoenix and Elixir?



Elixir is a programming language that runs on the Erlang virtual machine and provides features such as concurrency, fault-tolerance, distribution, metaprogramming, etc.


Phoenix is a web framework that is built with Elixir and provides features such as routing, controllers, views, templates, channels, presence, etc.


  • What are the benefits of using Phoenix?



Some of the benefits of using Phoenix are:


  • It is fast and scalable, thanks to its underlying Erlang/OTP platform.



  • It is productive and expressive, thanks to its Elixir syntax and features.



  • It is reliable and robust, thanks to its supervision trees and error handling mechanisms.



  • It is modern and innovative, thanks to its support for real-time features such as websockets and server-sent events.



  • It is flexible and extensible, thanks to its modular design and plug system.



  • It is friendly and supportive, thanks to its active and helpful community.



  • How can I update my existing Phoenix project to use Phoenix 1.5 beta 8?



If you have an existing Phoenix project that uses an older version of Phoenix, you can update it to use Phoenix 1.5 beta 8 by following these steps:


  • Edit your mix.exs file and change the version of :phoenix, :phoenix_html, :phoenix_live_view, :phoenix_pubsub, and :ecto_sql dependencies to use their latest versions.



  • Edit your .formatter.exs file and add : ... phoenix_live_view and :phoenix_live_dashboard to the :import_deps list.



  • Run mix deps.get to fetch the updated dependencies.



  • Run mix phx.new.web --live --no-gettext --no-ecto --path phoenix/installer to generate a new web project with Phoenix 1.5 beta 8.



  • Copy the files and folders from the newly generated project to your existing project, and merge any conflicts.



  • Run mix phx.server to start your updated project with Phoenix 1.5 beta 8.



You can also refer to the Phoenix 1.5 upgrade guide for more details and instructions.


  • How can I learn more about Phoenix 1.5 beta 8?



If you want to learn more about Phoenix 1.5 beta 8, you can check out the following resources:


  • The Phoenix changelog, where you can find the list of changes and improvements in each version of Phoenix.



  • The Phoenix guides, where you can find the official documentation and tutorials for Phoenix.



  • The Phoenix forum, where you can ask questions and get answers from other Phoenix users and developers.



  • The DockYard blog, where you can find articles and posts about Phoenix and Elixir by the DockYard team, who are one of the main contributors to Phoenix.



  • The Programming Phoenix 1.4 book, where you can learn how to build web applications with Phoenix from scratch by following a real-world example.



  • The Programming Phoenix LiveView book, where you can learn how to build interactive and real-time web applications with LiveView by following a real-world example.



  • What are some of the best practices for writing web applications with Phoenix?



Some of the best practices for writing web applications with Phoenix are:


  • Follow the conventions and standards that Phoenix provides, such as naming, formatting, testing, etc.



  • Leverage the features and tools that Phoenix offers, such as generators, plugs, channels, presence, etc.



  • Use Elixir idioms and patterns, such as pattern matching, recursion, pipelines, etc.



  • Write clean and readable code that follows the Elixir style guide and the formatter rules.



  • Write modular and reusable code that follows the single responsibility principle and the open-closed principle.



  • Write testable and maintainable code that follows the dependency inversion principle and the interface segregation principle.



  • Write scalable and performant code that follows the actor model and the OTP design principles.



  • Write secure and robust code that follows the principle of least privilege and the principle of fail-fast.



  • Write user-friendly and accessible code that follows the web standards and the web accessibility guidelines.



  • Write SEO-friendly and social-friendly code that follows the SEO best practices and the social media best practices.




About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page